Testimonials

"Ray handled our property as a rental first, the tenants were interested in buying. Ray helped both sides come to an agreement on terms and helped us every step of the way. He kept us informed which to me is critical! It is a pet peeve of mine when realtors ignore you or only call when there is a problem. Ray was never 'that' realtor! It was simple and unstressful, how all transactions should be! One word AWESOME! Ray was the perfect person for the job, after I spoke with him I was sold!" Dawn Wilcox
"It was an excellent selection Mr Armstrong was the best Agent we have ever dealt with (in12 moves). He is very professional, knowledgeable, personable. He took everything and followed through and kept us completely informed. To sum it up, I just can't say enough good things about dealing with him. He is the best of the best. The type of Agent you could ever hope to have the pleasure to deal with in real estate. It was a very easy transition from listing to closing. We listed on Thursday and under contract on Sunday." Ken and Darlene Collette
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Lead Poisoning

Lead poisoning is a serious problem that can lead to adverse health problems. In children, high levels of lead can cause damage to the brain and nervous system, behavioral and learning problems, slow growth, and hearing problems. In adults, lead poisoning can cause reproductive problems, high blood pressure, digestive problems, nerve disorder, memory and concentration problems, and muscle and joint pain.

Lead poisoning is especially a problem in cities with older buildings. Typically, lead is present in the paint from older buildings, in the water supply, and in the environment from cars and buses. Preventing lead poisoning in large cities, where there is such widespread possibility for exposure is both difficult and expensive. Federal programs have attempted to address this problem.

Lead poisoning is also an issue that buyers and sellers need to consider. Houses that were built before 1978 probably have paint that contains lead. Federal law requires that sellers disclose known information on lead-based paint hazards before selling a house. Sales contracts must include a federal form about lead-based paint in the building. Buyers will have up to 10 days to check for lead hazards and are likely to stipulate corrections.

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